Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 9:1-41.

As Jesus passed by he saw a man blind from birth.
His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?”
Jesus answered, “Neither he nor his parents sinned; it is so that the works of God might be made visible through him.
We have to do the works of the one who sent me while it is day. Night is coming when no one can work.
While I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”
When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made clay with the saliva, and smeared the clay on his eyes,
and said to him, “Go wash in the Pool of Siloam” (which means Sent). So he went and washed, and came back able to see.
His neighbors and those who had seen him earlier as a beggar said, “Isn’t this the one who used to sit and beg?”
Some said, “It is,” but others said, “No, he just looks like him.” He said, “I am.”
So they said to him, “(So) how were your eyes opened?”
He replied, “The man called Jesus made clay and anointed my eyes and told me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’ So I went there and washed and was able to see.”
And they said to him, “Where is he?” He said, “I don’t know.”
They brought the one who was once blind to the Pharisees.
Now Jesus had made clay and opened his eyes on a sabbath.
So then the Pharisees also asked him how he was able to see. He said to them, “He put clay on my eyes, and I washed, and now I can see.”
So some of the Pharisees said, “This man is not from God, because he does not keep the sabbath.” (But) others said, “How can a sinful man do such signs?” And there was a division among them.
So they said to the blind man again, “What do you have to say about him, since he opened your eyes?” He said, “He is a prophet.”
Now the Jews did not believe that he had been blind and gained his sight until they summoned the parents of the one who had gained his sight.
They asked them, “Is this your son, who you say was born blind? How does he now see?”
His parents answered and said, “We know that this is our son and that he was born blind.
We do not know how he sees now, nor do we know who opened his eyes. Ask him, he is of age; he can speak for him self.”
His parents said this because they were afraid of the Jews, for the Jews had already agreed that if anyone acknowledged him as the Messiah, he would be expelled from the synagogue.
For this reason his parents said, “He is of age; question him.”
So a second time they called the man who had been blind and said to him, “Give God the praise! We know that this man is a sinner.”
He replied, “If he is a sinner, I do not know. One thing I do know is that I was blind and now I see.”
So they said to him, “What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?”
He answered them, “I told you already and you did not listen. Why do you want to hear it again? Do you want to become his disciples, too?”
They ridiculed him and said, “You are that man’s disciple; we are disciples of Moses!
We know that God spoke to Moses, but we do not know where this one is from.”
The man answered and said to them, “This is what is so amazing, that you do not know where he is from, yet he opened my eyes.
We know that God does not listen to sinners, but if one is devout and does his will, he listens to him.
It is unheard of that anyone ever opened the eyes of a person born blind.
If this man were not from God, he would not be able to do anything.”
They answered and said to him, “You were born totally in sin, and are you trying to teach us?” Then they threw him out.
When Jesus heard that they had thrown him out, he found him and said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”
He answered and said, “Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”
Jesus said to him, “You have seen him and the one speaking with you is he.”
He said, “I do believe, Lord,” and he worshiped him.
Then Jesus said, “I came into this world for judgment, so that those who do not see might see, and those who do see might become blind.”
Some of the Pharisees who were with him heard this and said to him, “Surely we are not also blind, are we?”
Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would have no sin; but now you are saying, ‘We see,’ so your sin remains.

Copyright © Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, USCCB

Commentary of the day :

A homily written in North Africa in the 5th or 6th centuries, wrongly attributed to saint Fulgentius (467-532)
PL 65, 880

« We are the clay and you the potter ; we are all the work of your hands » (Is 64,7)

He who “enlightens everyone coming into this world” (Jn 1,9) is the true mirror of the Father. Christ passes by as the refulgence of the Father’s glory (Heb 1,3) and casts out the blindness in the eyes of those who cannot see. The Christ who comes from heaven passes by that all flesh might see him…; only those who are blind could not see Christ, mirror of the Father… Christ has opened this prison; he has opened the blind man’s eyes, who then saw in Christ the mirror of the Father…

The first man was created radiant but, once he had left the serpent, he found himself to be blind. This blind man began to be reborn when he started to believe… The man born blind was seated… without asking any doctor for ointment to heal his eyes… The maker of the world comes along and reflects his image into the mirror. He sees the wretchedness of the blind man seated there begging. What a miracle of God’s strength! It heals what it sees and enlightens that which it visits…

He who created the earthly orb has now opened the orbs of the blind man’s eyes… The potter who made us (Gn 2,6; Is 64,7) saw those empty eyes…; he touched them, mixing his saliva with earth and rubbing on this paste. The material that was used to form the eyes to begin with has now healed them. Which is the greater marvel: to create the orb of the sun or to recreate the eyes of the man born blind? The Lord, seated on his throne, made the sun to shine; passing through earth’s public squares he allowed the blind man to see. Light has come without our asking for it and, even without making supplication, the blind man was freed from his infirmity from birth.

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About padredanivha

A Catholic priest
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